Artist file


Florent Meng * 1982 in Paris, lives in Paris et Genève

Florent Meng (* 1982, lives and works in Paris and Geneva) is a former Workmaster student at HEAD-Genève. He has been developing for several years a work between fiction and documentary. He is currently assistant in the Information/fiction option. He has been nominated for the Bärtshi Gallery Human Rights Photography Prize (2016, Geneva). Dunes Of Deletes, has been shown at One Gee In Fog (2017), Laic Perspectives at Studio Sandra Recio (2010, Geneva) and Avant Premiere at the M [...]

Florent Meng (* 1982, lives and works in Paris and Geneva) is a former Workmaster student at HEAD-Genève. He has been developing for several years a work between fiction and documentary. He is currently assistant in the Information/fiction option. He has been nominated for the Bärtshi Gallery Human Rights Photography Prize (2016, Geneva). Dunes Of Deletes, has been shown at One Gee In Fog (2017), Laic Perspectives at Studio Sandra Recio (2010, Geneva) and Avant Premiere at the Musée de l’Elysée (2010, Lausanne). In 2011, les Éditions du CPG co-edited with la HEAD-Genève his first book, Préambule, Alinéa H.

Trails Of Sasabe (AZ/SN) is based around a frontier village that has the same name both in Mexico and the United States. Sasabe (AZ/SN) is known for being the last point of passage for migrants who set out to cross the Altar Desert in their quest to reach the main urban centres of Northern Arizona. The immense stretches of desert on either side of the border have become the main migratory route from the west of the country.  The majority of the landscape is made up of natural reserves where there is no boundary between the two countries. Those attempting to clandestinely cross the desert do so by avoiding the roads and trails. These migrants experience an overwhelming desire to both cross the border and at the same time, to be one with the desert, to disappear from the gaze of those who may be looking for them.

The thirteen images on display from Trails Of Sasabe (AZ/SN) highlight the complexity of the human body’s relationship to these border zones.

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