Jacques Berthet
UN ART DE LA DISPARITION Rumeur sur la ville

04.03 — 08.05.2016

The exhibition Un art de la disparition forges a link between the works of Genevan artists Jacques Berthet (born in 1949) and Martin Widmer (born in 1972).

Vernissage: 03.03.2016

It evokes the absence of the human figure in places where we least expect it, i.e. in a city in the daytime in the case of Jacques Berthet’s series Des palissades jaunes, and in a mirror in the case of Martin Widmer. It is not just a city emptied of its inhabitants that is evoked by Jacques Berthet’s photographs—they were taken for the Construction Department of the Canton of Geneva, just before the demonstration against the G8 in 2003—they also show a city walled in behind yellow fe [...]

It evokes the absence of the human figure in places where we least expect it, i.e. in a city in the daytime in the case of Jacques Berthet’s series Des palissades jaunes, and in a mirror in the case of Martin Widmer. It is not just a city emptied of its inhabitants that is evoked by Jacques Berthet’s photographs—they were taken for the Construction Department of the Canton of Geneva, just before the demonstration against the G8 in 2003—they also show a city walled in behind yellow fences, cut out and constructed with a watchmaker’s precision, a city barricaded against an unknown assailant. Martin Widmer’s new seriesObjets VII “Miroir” counters the popular belief that photography is a mirror. The artist puts forward the reverse argument by photographing mirrors and their reflection, in which neither his eye nor that of his camera appear. Un art de la disparition also echoes questions about urban development, a constant in the interest taken in “documentary style” in the CPG’s programming over the last 15 years, and in metaphotography (a photograph that questions photography) such as the work regularly undertaken in the CPG’s photographic laboratory, whether with fALSEfAKES in 2013, or with the Fétichismarchandiseexhibition that precedes this one, and also with Caméra(Auto)Contrôlethat follows it.


Sponsors

With the generous support of the following partner(s)

Artist file

Jacques Berthet * 1949 in Genève, lives in Genève

It evokes the absence of the human figure in places where we least expect it, i.e. in a city in the daytime in the case of Jacques Berthet’s series Des palissades jaunes, and in a mirror in the case of Martin Widmer. It is not just a city emptied of its inhabitants that is evoked by Jacques Berthet’s photographs—they were taken for the Construction Department of the Canton of Geneva, just before the demonstration against the G8 in 2003—they also show a city walled in behind yellow fe [...]

It evokes the absence of the human figure in places where we least expect it, i.e. in a city in the daytime in the case of Jacques Berthet’s series Des palissades jaunes, and in a mirror in the case of Martin Widmer. It is not just a city emptied of its inhabitants that is evoked by Jacques Berthet’s photographs—they were taken for the Construction Department of the Canton of Geneva, just before the demonstration against the G8 in 2003—they also show a city walled in behind yellow fences, cut out and constructed with a watchmaker’s precision, a city barricaded against an unknown assailant. Martin Widmer’s new seriesObjets VII “Miroir” counters the popular belief that photography is a mirror. The artist puts forward the reverse argument by photographing mirrors and their reflection, in which neither his eye nor that of his camera appear. Un art de la disparition also echoes questions about urban development, a constant in the interest taken in “documentary style” in the CPG’s programming over the last 15 years, and in metaphotography (a photograph that questions photography) such as the work regularly undertaken in the CPG’s photographic laboratory, whether with fALSEfAKES in 2013, or with the Fétichismarchandiseexhibition that precedes this one, and also with Caméra(Auto)Contrôlethat follows it.


Exhibition view

Related content