Antimatter: how to photograph the invisible ?
Linda Fregni Nagler & Michael Doser

11.06.2019

Lecture at 6:30 pm

Musée d’ethnographie de Genève | Boulevard Carl-Vogt 65 | 1205 Geneva

 

In the frame of the 50JPG 2019 parallel programme

50jpg.ch

Exploring the invisible is one of the main objectives of science — but how can it be photographed? The way in which we can form an image of what we do not see for ourselves has powerful repercussions on the way we apprehend this world, of which we can perceive only an infinitesimal fraction, whether dealing with research into the identity of dark matter, dark energy and the exploration of antimatter or its seeming absence in the visible universe. This lecture by Linda Fregni Nagler, a ph [...]

Exploring the invisible is one of the main objectives of science — but how can it be photographed? The way in which we can form an image of what we do not see for ourselves has powerful repercussions on the way we apprehend this world, of which we can perceive only an infinitesimal fraction, whether dealing with research into the identity of dark matter, dark energy and the exploration of antimatter or its seeming absence in the visible universe. This lecture by Linda Fregni Nagler, a photographer working in Milan on automated cognitive processes that dictate our way of perceiving the world, and Michael Doser, an experimental physicist working at CERN with special emphasis on antimatter, antihydrogen and its linkage to gravity, explores these questions by means of photography as well as through other technologies. These all have the shared characteristic of corresponding to technologically expanded perceptual equipment that has the potential to alter our cognitive apparatus.